About your Search

20121027
20121104
STATION
CNNW 20
CNN 13
CNBC 10
FBC 5
KQED (PBS) 5
KGO (ABC) 4
KRCB (PBS) 4
WMAR (ABC) 4
WETA 3
WJLA (ABC) 3
WMPT (PBS) 3
WRC (NBC) 3
KDTV (Univision) 2
KNTV (NBC) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 104
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 110 (some duplicates have been removed)
's response to a hurricane. he was in two weeks after hurricane katrina. are you confident that fema is prepared given the sheer size of this storm, almost a thousand miles in dimer. >> it is a huge storm and the impact will on the storm is so big, it is impacti sever states from dall the way up to maine at the same time. but i am rae very comfortable. we have a great administrator running the organization. he gets it, he's from florida, a good emergency manager. doesn't run around with his hair on fire. so i'm confident they will do a good job. >> on a conference call today n fact, your successor, mr. fugate said the disaster fund at fema has a billion dollars in t more or less. is that enough for this kind of response that will be necessary? >> probably at the end of the day the expenses will be more than that. but yes, it's enough for now. what the president has de, he psident has done a prelandfa declaration of all of the states up the east coast. so that allows the administrator to move supplies in now, move people in now, rescue teams in, and to get ready, work with those emerg
costs will surpass those from hurricanes irene and katrina. although there are countless businesses hurt, others could see a boost. erika miller reports. >> reporter: when you consider the massive amounts of flooding, downed trees, and damage to transportation networks, it could take days-- if not weeks, to tally up the financial costs from the storm. but already there are predictions sandy will be the most expensive clean-up in u.s. history. the most serious damage appears to be caused by flooding along the east coast. according to economic tracking firm i.h.s. global insight, property damage will likely surpass $20 billion. add to that as much as $30 billion in lost business, and the total financial toll could end up being close to $50 billion. hotels, stores, airlines, and restaurants have lost business they wot get back. insurance companies will have to make big payouts, which will likely mean higher insurance premiums for customers down the road. here in new york city, commerce has been crippled. and power is not expected to be restored in many areas until next week. i.h.s. global p
airlines to talk about the impact on the industry and the man who led fema during hurricane katrina will tell us what the federal emergency agency should expect from this storm. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use, it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. you have to dig a little. fidelity's etf market tracker shows you the big picture on how different asset classes are performing, and it lets you go in for a closer look at areas within a class or sector that may be bucking a larger trend. i'm stephen hett of fidelity investments. the etf market tracker is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades today and explore your next investing idea. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. >> we talked
with hurricane katrina. here's live in studio with me just moments away. >>> and you know this storm is throwing a big monkey-wrench into the battle for the white house. battleground states are in hurricane sandy's path. which candidate does the storm help or hurt? what if there was a new way to deal with money that focused less on fees and more... on what matters? maybe your bank account is taking too much time and maybe it's costing too much money. introducing bluebird by american express and walmart. your alternative to checking and debit. it's loaded with features, not fees. because we think your money should stay where it belongs. with you. the value you expect. the service you deserve. it feels good to bluebird. get it at your local walmart. >>> this is your prais for breaking coverage of hurricane sandy and the election. we will be carrying this at least until 11:00 p.m. eastern tonight, possibly longer if it warrants, because this storm is forecast to be a monster when it makes landfall. don't go anywhere. a lot of people said they are holed up in hotel rooms and stuck at airports watchi
in and that mindset of dissolving governme government, then when you have katrina and you have the storm we get the kind of response we got then and a lot of people suffering and basically on our own. that is the scary part. all back to the fact that it will get worse and worse over time and more and more heated that you have heard the thought that it is time to act and do something and you can't count on government to save you. i live in new york and they could not help many people. 60 houses burned to the ground because how could you respond in three feet of water? host: are you referring it the fires in brooklyn? >> yes, breezy point. it is too much to be responded to by too few resources and there is no power, there is no pumps. it is just crazy. you say how much trust can you have in government? whether can government do to the extent that you have places inundated. you get the point. if it dealt with in a serious way which neither party is doing, it is a joke. they are a small group of voices who argue to muddy the water when it is clearly in favor of something is going on and you need to
they have a lot in common with the people of the gulf coast who suffered through katrina in 2005. the sheer size and scope of the destruction from hurricane sandy stretches for hundreds of miles, from the jersey shore, to long island. this was a big storm, and has brought a significant part of the country to its knees. >> look at this line! it goes back -- this line goes six miles. look at this! >> reporter: with power still out to millions of people, one of the biggest daily concerns has become gasoline. some lines at stations that still have gas stretched for blocks. tempers of the drivers in those lines frayed. and police have even been called in to patrol the lines to keep the peace. >> i need to run my taxi too. >> reporter: there were some signs of meaningful progress. in new york city, more train and subway service was added. all told, the electricity is back on for more than 4 million homes and businesses across the northeast. >> oh, my god! >> reporter: this evening, the lights came back on in new york's greenwich village, something worth celebrating. and all but two of atlantic ci
to katrina, that very first night when people thought the storm had passed, what we thought the conditions were, when daylight came the next morning and we found out it was vastly different and much worse. we're hoping that we don't have that situation here in new york. we don't have levees in new york, but when daylight comes, we may be open for a rude awakening. as for thathat's dangling over the city, make no mistake about it. that is extremely serious. when you have a piece of metal like that hanging, think of a hanger and something called reverse bending fatigue. you keep bending it enough, and the wind bends it and bends it, just like with a hanger, back and forth, back and forth, it will eventually break. let's hope that is not going to happen here. that's a very dangerous situation, a very large crane. now to go to the very latest on sandy's path. meteorologist rick reichmuth in the fox extreme weather center. rick? >> i walked by that crane this morning on my way to work and i saw it. i thought how is that crane still up there when you've got winds at that height gusting to 90 to
what's happening there reminds him of katrina. gary, tell me why you believe that. >> reporter: piers, this is a city of 50,000 people right across the hudson river in new york city. yes, it does remind me of hurricane katrina because behind us, we have 50% of hoboken flooded and there are, according to the mayor, thousands of people in their apartments and homes who can't get out right now. so we actually went on a front loader with the mayor, they're using front loaders who rescue people. what's different about this than new orleans, what we saw in katrina in 2005 when we went down streets in boats, there are no casualties. that's the good news. but they're still not 100% sure. people can't leave their homes, not only because the water's deep but because there's live power lines in the water. so as we're going down the street in the front loader we see people waving from the windows, children, men, women, and most of them seem to have smiles on their faces because they have seen the water recede. in new orleans the water kept getting higher. this water is receding but people are wai
preventivas y de seguridad para no tener catástrofes como con katrina pero temen que la población se confíe. >>> nayeli, muchas gracias, continuamos contigo, estuvimos recorriendo las calles >>> la principal preocupación no es tanto el viento, las ráfagas de viento, hemos tenido tormentas con más potencia, las mareas donde la población está al lado del mar, tenemos cómo las calles dan al mar, y estas zonas posiblemente se pueden ver inundadas, esta es la mayor preocupación, seguramente en esta zona, muy seguramente en varios sectores de la costa, tenemos oleajes records, niveles de oleaje record, y la marea de la tormenta subirá más y más >>> curiosamente el primer mega impacto de la tormenta es de orden político, porque el presidente barack obama y mitt romney han cambiado su campaña, pero eso es otro tema, ahora lo importante son las precauciones de las persona que están en la costa, tomar alertas y no bajar la guardia, lourdes ramos, regresamos a los estudios, para que nos amplíes qué se ve en los mapas. >>> gracias, ffélix de bedout, es momento de pasar con cuestión ta
katrina. >> yeah, that's one of the problems. >> governor christy said you couldn't even call it a levy. it's just a berm holding back the water, like the bank of a river, and it was breached into it is flooding these three towns with four or five feet of water, so that is not good, but we are taking your calls this morning at 1-800-steph-1-2. going to be talking about hurricane sandy, and the political ramifications of everything going on on the east coast. whether obama is doing a good job handling the situation, governor christy, the mayors of new york and all of those towns, and yeah just getting your thoughts on what is going on on the east coast. so we'll be taking a break here. give us a call 1-800-steph-1-2 the phone number toll free from anywhere. this is the "stephanie miller show," with chris, jim, and jacki. >> on the "stephanie miller show" "stephanie miller show" radio show in suburban america this morning -- >> announcer: it's the "stephanie miller show." ♪ rich, chewy caramel rolled up in smooth milk chocolate. don't forget about that payroll
katrina devastated new orleans, it seems all the relevant agencies were ready this time, up to speed, especially fema, the federal emergency management agency, that was criticized in 2005 being widely lauded now. the president himself was up all night from monday to tuesday in the situation room in the white house monitoring the situation. now he is touring the disaster areas, especially in new jersey, so he seemed very much concerned and seemed to do everything he could to help the people. he has been applauded even by republican competitors for this. one of his harshest critics has always been new jersey governor chris christie, and this man said that obama was doing an outstanding job. >> elections are right around the corner next week, and campaigns have resumed. it is a difficult question to ask, but who has actually profited from the situation? >> for mitt romney, it is a difficult situation because national disaster times are times when politics are supposed to be put aside, so campaigning too early might hurt him, but it is the only thing he can do because he does not have an
about 10% of the country's economic output. by comparison, hurricane katrina cost $40 billion in damage. >>> getting cell phone reception could be easier. at&t and t mobile are agreeing to share networking to help those affected by the storm. it'll let people use whatever network they have. people won't have to pay or do anything. calls will connect through the network with the strongest significant tall signal. >>> and 20,000 flights canceled because of the storm so now the airlines are trying to get back on track. they are rebooking passenger ifs on new flights though some airports are still working to clear some of the floodwaters. they are deploying workers to answer the phones and help rebook or cancel tickets for up to two million travelers. >> we have a 4-year-old all fed up with all the talk. how she breaks down after listening to much of -- >>> and the behind the scene, revealing what you will see tonight on the cma awards. . >>> still watching sandy spin just to the north. she has changed hour weather pattern. before the weekend talking about temperatures in the 70s, little i
's katrina, ike, andrew, irene, they're all late august or early september storms where the vacation industrial was more vulnerable. right now, it will be interesting to see the tradeoff from staples into discretionary spending. getting into the holiday season. >> just looking at the trading today, when you look at exposed sectors like insurance, retail and construction, do you think we'll get the moves that you would assume or not? >> i'd be careful expecting too big a move here. partly because of volumes, as i mentioned earlier. it's unclear about how exposed these stocks are going to be. i think expect some mixed messages here throughout the day. >> we're seeing certainly the insurers hold up well. there's a sense they may benefit from firmer pricing next year, something households should be aware of, potentially facing higher premiums as a result of this. >> very difficult to pull a trade out of the storm today. >> just one thing about gasoline, it seems to have already moved slightly. anything on the energy side? >> i think if you go back to the past oil flash gasoline spikes re
. do you think they would have run the new orleans marathon the week of katrina? >> right. i don't think so. >> steve: of course not. >> gretchen: rest of the headlines for saturday. president obama ordering the military to send extra gallons of fuel to new york and in the wake of seand. gas shortages unless people panicked. gas will be rationed starting at noon people with license plates ending in odd number will only be able to buy gas. cars with license plates ending in even number can fill up on even numbered days. four ohio men busted for stealing mitt romney campaign signs. some were found in a union truck. police found tools that could be used to take signs down. local campaign workers have had problems with signs being stolen. this the is first time someone has been caught. the men were arrested and face misdemeanor charges. people in parts ofism know are going to have to pony up extra money if they want to buy a gun now. cook county, which includes chicago, has approved a tax that charges people 2 a dollars for every gun that they buy. well, the move is expected to raise
. this was not an evacuation zone. >> i can relate to your guest there, after hurricane katrina, what that is like to search for relatives. it takes days and days to figure out where folks are and sort it out. if this is search and rescue effort are we assuming people that they are trying to get to and find are okay, that they are alive, not injured, they are in fairly decent condition? >> yeah. the last we talked to executives here, from the county, no fatalities. they felt confident about that. of course until they get in there themselves and see we're not going to have final word. we're keeping fingers crossed. we do have a little bit of cell phone, it's spotty. there is no power. we were speaking to another woman before who said they had jet skis, that they stored for the winter, her husband took it out. he was ferrying people around to dry land, coming back here. people coming in reporting who is left, neighbors that need help. that is helping. daylight's important. as you know, officials here scrambling to do house-to-house searches while they have light because there's no power in the area. >> thank
with the business of politics is impacted by weather and remember, katrina and what happened with george w. bush's reputation, it's impacted other politicians along the way. let's talk now about the actual event itself. george is a storm chaser. george, have you ever seen-- first of all, it's such a late season hurricane and it's meeting with the arctic air from canada and the low pressure system coming from the west. what's going to -- what's going to happen. first of all, what's it like where you are and what's going to happen? >> well, right now, i'm similar to the weather system from canada, i'm on myself on my way from canada. it's calm right now. getting near the pa-new jersey border getting into position to go down near the water in jersey or long island and i've never seen anything quite like this. been through about 16 hurricanes, including katrina, rita and ike and although this isn't the most powerful storm i've been in, it's certainly the largest and i'm curious to see what's going to happen because it's not often you see this type of combination of weather systems, impacting a pop l
through like katrina or like irene? >> every storm is different, as i said. we have their own hazards. irene was a storm that moved parallel to the coast with most of the heaviest weather to the right so there were a lot of folks very close to the center in new jersey, for example, that didn't really know that there was a lot going on. this storm instead, first of all, it's much larger than irene. it's coming directly at the coast instead of parallelling it. the effects are spanning hundreds and hundreds of miles, much more so than irene. >> ifill: this storm is hovering with lots of rain centered over one area. how many days do you expect we'll be coping with the fallout from all of that? >> well, i think that it's going to take until wednesday before conditions really significantly improve so that people can get back and start looking at what happened. tomorrow it's still going to be a bad day because the system is going to slow down once it gets towards pennsylvania. it will weaken, but it's going to take a long time for this system to wind down. >> ifill: james franklin of the nat
far in advance. >> have you covered many hurricane, katrina and isaac. compare, if you can, for us, some of the images you are seeing of sandy and images that you yourself took from those two storms? >> well, katrina was a fascinating experience, very destructive and the biggest storm i think i have seen, certainly the most destructive hurricane. i was -- dicover isaac a few months ago and irene in new york city. people are learning very quickly, the power of water. it doesn't sound that dramatic. but, boy, when you see it energized and pushed up the way sandy was, it's an awakening. >> we have had at least 69 deaths reported from sandy, so far from when it touched down in the cribbia, to here across the east coast. what about the dangers of the storms? you personally? have you ever experienced close calls? >> hurricane charlie in 2004, intensified unexpectedly and turned and came into the ponte gorda area in florida and nearly killed my partner, greg, a meteorologist and myself. i have learned to be extra careful. i was very satisfied to see how much warning was given regarding sa
how much money geico has made since the katrina year, how much buffett has made? a fortune. what was that, 2005? >> yeah. >> but i do wonder if you did have trading this morning, what somebody look travelers or berkshire would be trading at. >> but weaved had less hurricanes since 2005 than you would think. >> refinery, do you know anything about the plants around here? >> i don't know the specific plans, but i know that's certainly a risk. about 7% of the nation's refining is done here in new jersey and dwell wear. and they're right in the path. absolutely right in the path. so i would expect to see those guys shut in if they haven't already. which will impact obviously gas prices. >> there was speculation how you could see oil prices drop because no one will be taking supply. >> that's true. absolutely. >> paul, thank you very much. you'll be in-house with us. >> i'm weathering the storm here. >> andrew, i'm not kidding, last week, a sociologist writing for the huffington "post" said if this doesn't get us to completely try to get off all fossil fuels as quickly as we possibly
's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet, all that water coming on in and the high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here unfortunately. >> all right. mark mann cue sew from accuweather. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy and what the red cau cross is doing to help out. >> plus more incredible rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. en. we'll be right back. >> announcer: "america this morning" brought to you by 5 hour energy. 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. so i can get the energized feeling i need and support a great cause? i'm sold. pink lemonade 5-hour energy? yeah and a portion of every sale goes to the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. i'm sold. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy. get the alert, energized feeling you need and support breast cancer research and access to care. but what about your wrinkles? neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair visibly reduces fine lines and wrinkles in just one week. why wait if you don't have to. neutrogena®. [ male annou
activity. >> it will depend on what the damage actually is when we get through the process. katrina when it hit new orleans was one thing about a it was so devastating, it wiped out literally homes and roads and bridges and caused a mass amount of devastation, so a huge amount of rebuilding there. what's important here going forward is that you are going to get economic support from this at least in the short term. is there a lot of severe structural damage that has to be replaced. but about don't forget one thing, when you can to this type of activity, there is one negative impact of this longer term which is that you pull forward future activity. so money spent today that would have been spent potentially later on. so a short term boost for the economy and longer it term still the concerns of the overall weakness. >> especially when it comes to flood insurance, a lot of that comes from the federal coughers when they're under more scrutiny than ever. going into next year, do you expect this to change the tenor around government spending at all? >> well, that's kind of an interesting que
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 110 (some duplicates have been removed)